Offline Installation of Armory on Tails and Ubuntu Linux ...

Getting frustrated with Ubuntu. Are my experiences the norm for a Linux user?

Let me start off by saying that I'm not a total newb, but still pretty green. I like to believe I'm capable with computers, and know enough to figure out most issues. I also have a pretty solid general understanding of how they function. Been a Windows user most of my life, but decided to make the switch to Linux a few years back.
My experiences thus far are making me reconsider the switch, despite the fact that I've really become opposed to using Windows. I'm curious if I should expect more of the same indefinitely, or if my experiences up to this point are unusual, and I should expect to reach a point where I can just use the OS, instead of spend hours trying to perform every task.
It all started when I downloaded Ubuntu about three years ago. I easily got it installed as a dual boot on a Windows machine. Had to start by allocating disk space in Windows for the new Linux install, prepared a live usb, went through the install, cake. Then I started trying to do stuff, like use a printer. Well HP doesn't make a driver for Linux and, probably, 2-4 hours of research led to me still not having a working printer. I found a driver, but the process to get it installed did not work as it was supposed to. I forget the specifics, but I followed a tutorial to the T, but ran into unforeseen installation issues, and never could figure out how to get the process complete.
After that I started running into issues with the FireFox browser. I've alwasy used FF on Windows with no issues. On Ubuntu it ran slower than dial-up from the mid-90's. Again, 2-4 hours worth of research and several changes to things like FF settings, disabling add-ons, etc., and I still had no fix.
Still I wasn't deterred. Then the dual boot broke. I tried boot repair. No dice. Tried for several hours to get it working. Asked about it on forums, sent in results of boot repair (where I forget) only to get no response, and finally I threw in the towel.
I also struggled to get Bitcoin Armory working, with some very frustrating success, but I didn't count that against Linux, since it was very new software, and I wasn't surprised it was buggy.
Fast forward to today. I've been using Windows for a couple years, with few attempts made to use Linux, except for trying to retrieve a very small amount of BTC from Armory, which consumed about three weekends of my life to finally achieve.
Now I've decided to give it another go. I downloaded UbuntuStudio b/c I'd like to use some of the music production software that comes with it.
Following some tutorials online, I tried to connect my midi keyboard to the computer using QJackCtl. I couldn't remember the issue that I ran into when starting to type this up, so I tried to repeat the process, only to have the program crash during start up, three times. The computer had literally just restarted 20 minutes ago, so I doubt a reboot would work, but maybe. It's almost funny at this point. I'm really disappointed that I can't get the audio software that came with the distro working "fresh out of the box." Maybe with a few hours, or weekends, worth of research?
I've also been getting a system error message every time I login. I posted a query on the Ubuntu forums. That issue has yet to be sorted out.
I hesitate to include this next part, because it involves software that is really still in it's early stages, and I'm trying to be realistic in taking the perspective that any problems I encounter are with the new software, not Ubuntu, but the fact that I had zero problems getting the same stuff to work in Windows just adds to my frustration with Ubuntu.
Everything I'm about to describe is involved with installing monero mining and wallet software. The exception is the AMD drivers needed for the GPU I'm using to mine. Those I expected to work without issue. I followed the directions for installing the AMD drivers for Ubuntu on the AMD website, and the program would not work. After, you guessed it, 2-4 hours of research, I finally, almost by accident, installed an older version of the driver software. Boom, it worked. WTF man?! When I installed the Windows version it took 2 minutes.
Moving on, I tried getting the xmr-stak mining software working. This took me several hours, spread over several days to sort out. Same with the monero-gui wallet, which actually I've only got half-way working. In fact, I've tried installing the monero-gui by two different ways. In the process I've inadvertently got the monerod daemon running, but not the gui. Actually, the monerod daemon starts with the computer and I haven't even started trying to figure out how to turn that off, since what's the point of having it run if I can't use the gui?
In Windows I had all of this up and running in a couple of hours. And in saying that I'm prepared for the "if you like Windows so much then use that!" or "you're just too thick to figure it out!", but I don't like Windows, and I don't think it's a matter of not figuring it out. It seems to me that the reason I've spent dozens of hours just trying to get things to work in Linux is that nearly every time I've tried to do something, there is inevatably some error along the way where following the directions isn't good enough, and sorting out the issue is a feat in and of itself.
I just want to know if this is unusual, or if this is how it's going to go forever if I keep using Linux. Is my experience typical?
TL;DR: I've had a litany of issues and spent countless hours trying to fix them using Linux. Is this rare, and I've just had an unusual experience, or actually pretty common, and I should just accept it as the cost of using an open source OS?
submitted by rtfioeti to Ubuntu [link] [comments]

Has anyone been able to export private keys from Armory?

Hi everyone,
I am super pissed but I am going to try and keep it low key. I have a wallet that I saved in Armory years ago, and I want to move coins from it now. I had looked online a few months ago, and it said that I could export the private keys from Armory and sweep them into Electrum.
Well, today I tried it in both Armory 1.35 on Windows and the latest version on Linux. It doesn't work at all.
You can open a window after choosing to backup individual keys, and there are checkboxes there for all the different types of keys you could want, but checking and unchecking them DOES NOTHING.
All you can get is the Armory backup string for the wallet. That you already have, if you have restored the wallet from a paper backup.
Time to download all 120Gb of the blockchain I guess. Has anyone ever exported private keys from Armory? Am I doing something wrong?
Thanks.
Edit: PSA: Armory does not work at all on a fresh Ubuntu 17 install. It just fails silently and doesn't install. Neither does it work on MacOS El Capitan. On Debian 8, not all of the dependencies are installed properly during installation. I'm afraid to update my Windows copy now.
Edit: Bit the bullet and did it. Got it working on Ubuntu and found out that you have to start bitcoind in the background and play with some Armory settings to get it to run, then downloaded the whole thing from bitcoin-qt. Turns out I was right - Armory doesn't know the private keys until after it has downloaded the whole blockchain. And spent an hour chewing through transactions. AND you've restarted it twice. But I finally got them. Thanks everyone!
submitted by nkvjhi76897yeriu32gr to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Introducing BitcoinOS - Linux distro with several Bitcoin wallets included

Hi people, I just released a Linux distro with several Bitcoin wallets pre-installed.
Features of BitcoinOS 0.1 (Alpha 1):
Links:
This is still alpha/experimental, so it is not completely user-friendly and there is not yet a lot of documentation, but it is usable.
Note: I'm the lead developer (proof), feel free to ask me any questions
submitted by david73wood to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Colored coin client preview #1 (based on Bitcoin Armory)

I think it's already good enough for people to play with it. (Although certainly it's not ready for anything serious.)
For people who are not familiar with concept, colored coins is a technology which allows people to represent arbitrary tokens (e.g. issue private currencies, stocks, bonds, etc.) using small quantities of bitcoins. It is interesting because it would allow us to create decentralized and secure markets. (As decentralized and secure as Bitcoin itself, at least in theory.) See here.
Notes about current release:
Windows binaries: http://killerstorm.xen.prgmr.com/alex/ArmoryX-0.2.5.zip
There are no Linux binaries, but it's really easy to build it on Ubuntu or Debian:
(Note: if you're already using Armory, it is a good idea to hide you ~/.armory so it won't be seen by this experimental Armory mod. Or, perhaps, just don't run this experimental mod.)
Before you run it, make sure that bitcoind or Bitcoin-Qt is running and fully sync'ed. Armory takes up to 10 minutes to start (this version is slower because it additionally scans for colored transactions) and requires ~ 1 GB of RAM.
At start it will offer to create a wallet, do not enable encryption, otherwise issuing colored coins won't work.
Send some bitcoins to this new wallet, 0.02 BTC is probably enough to issue some colored coins and to pay for tx fees.
There is a drop down to choose color. Balance is displayed for a currently chosen color (i.e. if you chose TESTcc it will show how many TESTcc units this wallet owns), and when you send coins you send coins of that color.
Initially 'uncolored' is selected, it means normal BTC. This drop down also has TESTcc ("test colored coins") and "All colors" (this mode is just for debugging, you cannot send coins in this mode).
Here's what you can do now:
  1. Ask somebody to send you TESTcc. (We want to make it automatic, Satoshi Dice style, but unfortunately that code isn't quite ready.)
  2. Find and install other color definitions.
  3. Issue your own colored coins and send them to somebody who wants them. (LOL.)
Let's start from option #3. There is 'Hallucinate' menu. (It is called 'hallucinate' because colors do not exist on blockchain level, it is a client-side convention.) Choose 'Issue colored coins'. Likely all you need to change is name, but you can tweak satoshi-per-unit and number of units if you want.
When you click Issue it will create a new transaction (using your uncolored BTC) and will create a color definition. Optionally it will also upload your color definition to color definition registry. (This registry runs on my server, it might be down.)
You should note ColorID, this is how other people can refer to these coins (name is ambiguous).
You can now choose this new color in drop down and it will show your balance. (E.g. 1000 units.)
Now you'll perhaps want to send these coins to somebody. That person would need to install your color definition first. If you send colored coins without warning they might be lost, i.e. mixed with uncolored ones. For same reason it makes no sense to send them to wallet which isn't color aware.
For example, you can post on some forum:
I've issued LOLwut coins (ColorID: 36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54), each unit represents a bond with face value of 0.1 BTC payable by me, Trololo, via buy back. I promise to buy back all bonds in a month.
Now people who are interested in this LOLwut coin issue will copy ColorID, paste it into Hallucinate > Download color definition dialog, and if this color definition is published it will be downloaded and installed. Armory restart is required to complete installation.
After installation that person will be able to see these LOLwut coins.
Note that if you do not trust my registration server, you can publish color definition yourself: go to ~/.armory/colordefs, find 36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54.colordef and upload it to your web server. Then you can give people URL like http://example.com/36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54.colordef and they can download it by URL.
Or they can just obtain this file by any means and copy it to ~/.armory/colordefs directory. It is decentralized, nobody can prevent you from issuing colored coins.
I think that's all. There is also Hallucinate > Manage color definitions dialog, but I hope it's easy to figure out how it works.
We are working on improved version, particularly on p2p exchange feature.
I've set up an IRC channel for people to talk about trying out colored coins: #colored-coins-otc on Freenode.
submitted by killerstorm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Armory Cold Storage Questions

So I know there's been posts on this topic before, as well as other guides online, but I still have a few questions after reading them that I was hoping you all could answer. The Bitcoin Armory site has directions for cold storage, but they are pretty general and don't go much into the specifics, so I am using this tutorial as my starting point:
http://falkvinge.net/2014/02/10/placing-your-crypto-wealth-in-cold-storage-installing-armory-on-ubuntu/
So I guess my first question is, is there anything blatantly wrong that you guys see with this tutorial?
2.) Why does the tutorial recommend Ubuntu LTS, is there something you guys would recommend more?
3.) Are python-qt4, python-twisted, and python-psutil still the packages needed to be installed for Armory to function? This article is about 8 months old, so are the directions for installing apt-offline and those three packages still correct?
4.) When downloading Armory on the online computer in order to install on the offline computer, I would like to verify the signature of the download. However, the computer that I currently own is a Mac, and the Armory website says that verifying the signatures is only easily performed on a Linux Machine. I was planning on purchasing a cheap computer to install Linux on and use as my cold storage. I can't imagine that I must purchase two; one to download Armory on and one to use as my cold storage. Could anyone here walk me through how to either verify the signature on a Mac or let me know of some other way to do this securely?
5.) At the bottom on Armory's tutorial, they recommend disabling autorun functionality for USB's in the case of USB virus's (highly unlikely, but if there's something that can be done to prevent it, why not). They link to instructions for Windows, and I was wondering if anyone knew how to get this done on Ubuntu.
I apologize if these questions have been answered before, but I was unable to find them. Thank you in advance for all the help and I appreciate your time; I know topics like this are pretty boring to read/answer compared to the other stuff that's usually posted on bitcoin.
submitted by ArmoryQuestions to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

More Paper Wallet Questions

Was inspired by u/leapyear_0229 to also move my small investment from coinbase to a paper wallet. In researching this, I have the following questions I was hoping you experts could answer!
Say you have a completely offline computer, wiped with Daric’s Boot and Nuke, and then installed with Ubuntu or Linux via USB. Is making a paper wallet as simple as going to bitaddress.org and creating public/private keys and then sending your bitcoin from coinbase to the public key? If so: 1. How does one generate public/private keys from bitaddress if the computer is offline? 2. How does the block chain know that the public key I’m sending my bitcoin to is associated with my specific private key? 3. Everyone keeps talking about Armory and Electrum—what’s the point of these services if I don’t seem to need them to move to paper wallets?
Thank you!
submitted by btcnooob to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Sure Bitcoin is safe Grandma. This is all you have to do to really secure your money

THIS IS FUCKED. BITCOIN HAS NO FUTURE IF WE CAN'T FIND A BETTER WAY TO MAKE IT SECURE. MAIN STREET WILL RUN A MILE FROM IT.
Xpost from: http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1d26gw/cold_storage_how_i_did_it/
With the recent events surrounding blockchain.info wallet attacks, I decided to bite the bullet and send all my coins to my cold wallet. It's a bit nerve wrecking but I managed. Here's what I did:
Download offline version of Armory here[1] (section Linux – Offline Bundle for Ubuntu 10.04)
Download Brainwallet source from github[2] for signing transactions, rather than the suggested way from armory website, since I don't want to run a full Bitcoin-qt client + armory to create an unsigned tx. More on this later
Prepare a USB pendrive for linux here[3] using the suggested Ubuntu 10.04 by Armory.
Boot into Linux using that pendrive. Install the Armory software and generate a new wallet. Make sure you make appropriate backup (paper copy or just write down the seed). You can always regenerate your entire wallet via brainwallet.org copy (tab Chains).
If you want, make a watch only copy of your wallet, and you can get all the public address in that wallet from your online computer via Armory offline version. Save the watch only wallet on your windows partition.
Reboot into windows/mac/your main OS.
Install armory and import the watch only wallet to see all of your addresses.
Try to move a small fund into one of the cold-storage addresses. Wait for it to have 6 confirmations. Then we can try to spend that fund by doing the following:
Get unspent output from your cold-storage address: https://blockchain.info/unspent?address=[4] Copy the output into a text file, leave it on your windows machine. Linux copy will be able to read this file.
Boot back into linux on your pendrive. Use saved brainwallet.org website to sign that transaction (use tab Transaction) by pasting the private key of the address (get from Armory, without space) and the unspent output. Sign the message. Then save the output to the same txt file.
Boot back into your main OS. Paste that signed output to http://blockchain.info/pushtx[5] and push it. You're good to go. You spent your fund in your cold storage.
Now, move everything you have from your online storage there.
submitted by BitCoinWarrior to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

HOWTO: Run a Full Bitcoin Node + Armory

Estimated total time: Up to 2 hours, not including blockchain downloading.
You can install this on a VPS, a spare PC, or on your own PC. You can install it in Virtualbox on your own PC, or into Windows. If you just want to try it out, I recommend installing in Virtualbox.
  1. Download and install Virtualbox from (https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads), and download an Ubuntu 14.04 64bit Desktop ISO from http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop, and follow the guide here (I recommend 2GB of RAM, 3GB if you can spare it): http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/virtualbox . It's a little outdated but close enough that things are the same.  
  2. After installing Ubuntu in Virtualbox, to make it fullscreen you will need Guest Additions. Run these commands by clicking on the swirl icon top right, typing ter and opening Terminal: sudo apt-get install build-essentials module-assistant and then sudo m-a prepare Before selecting Devices > Insert Guest Additions CD image, telling Ubuntu to install them, and shutting down. //Thanks go to http://www.binarytides.com/vbox-guest-additions-ubuntu-14-04 for those instructions.//  
  3. Next I went into the Virtual Machines settings and changed Network Adapter 1 to be "Attached to Bridged Network" instead of "Attached to NAT".  
  4. After booting the machine back up, I followed the steps here: https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node/#linux-instructions And installed both bitcoin-qt and bitcoind. Skip over the parts where you edit bitcoin-qt's settings to start at boot, or edit cron to start bitcoind at boot, since this will interfere with using armory.  
  5. Next I followed the instructions here to install Armory: http://bitzuma.com/posts/offline-installation-of-armory-on-tails-and-ubuntu-linux/ The reason I used these instructions was because I was having difficulty getting Armory to install (online or offline) on Ubuntu 14.04. Might just be me.  
  6. I then started up Armory in Offline Mode by clicking on the swirl icon top left and typing Armory. In the program, after clicking Skip, I scrolled down slightly, clicked on Download Bitcoin, Download, and agreed to let it do whatever it wanted to; (which was download and install Satoshi).  
  7. I then closed Armory Offline and opened Armory, which began downloading the blockchain from a torrent. I then went into File > Settings (top left of your screen, near the swirl; menu options will appear once the mouse hits that taskbar) and personally chose to Disable OS and version reporting. There is a setting here for "Enable settings for proxies/Tor" but I haven't ticked it yet, since I haven't set Tor up.  
  8. Follow the instructions here to set up port forwarding so your node is reachable, and to test this: https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node#network-configuration  
Next:
If I want to broadcast transactions over Tor, but not receive incoming connections over Tor, is that a problem for the health of the Bitcoin Tor network? Or will those transactions be broadcast out to "clearnet" nodes, as opposed to hidden ones?
Thanks to all writers of articles referenced here for your help.
By the way, even if you don't want to run a bitcoin node full time, I've read that running one even 6 hours a day is useful. These are instructions for ubuntu but you can also run it from Windows on the same machine you work on (I don't know about privacy implications). Perhaps someone should write an article about running a bitcoin node on your PC at work!
submitted by FullNodeGuide to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Offline Hardware Wallet Options Ranked

Hello bitcoiners,
I just purchased 0.10506 worth of bitcoin and which is sitting in CoinJar (an Australian online wallet company). I have two factor authentication. Is it okay to have such a small amount online?
As I increase the amount of bitcoin I own, I would obviously want to store them securely in an offline hardware wallet. What are my best options out of the following?
I understand the best option would be to use another computer running Ubuntu/Linux that has never been connected to the internet but I would rather not drop $500AUD on a new computer.
Cheers!
submitted by upallnighttog3tlucky to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Armory Cold Storage Questions (X-Post from r/Bitcoin)

So I know there's been posts on this topic before, as well as other guides online, but I still have a few questions after reading them that I was hoping you all could answer. The Bitcoin Armory site has directions for cold storage, but they are pretty general and don't go much into the specifics, so I am using this tutorial as my starting point:
http://falkvinge.net/2014/02/10/placing-your-crypto-wealth-in-cold-storage-installing-armory-on-ubuntu/
So I guess my first question is, is there anything blatantly wrong that you guys see with this tutorial?
2.) Why does the tutorial recommend Ubuntu LTS, is there something you guys would recommend more?
3.) Are python-qt4, python-twisted, and python-psutil still the packages needed to be installed for Armory to function? This article is about 8 months old, so are the directions for installing apt-offline and those three packages still correct?
4.) When downloading Armory on the online computer in order to install on the offline computer, I would like to verify the signature of the download. However, the computer that I currently own is a Mac, and the Armory website says that verifying the signatures is only easily performed on a Linux Machine. I was planning on purchasing a cheap computer to install Linux on and use as my cold storage. I can't imagine that I must purchase two; one to download Armory on and one to use as my cold storage. Could anyone here walk me through how to either verify the signature on a Mac or let me know of some other way to do this securely?
5.) At the bottom on Armory's tutorial, they recommend disabling autorun functionality for USB's in the case of USB virus's (highly unlikely, but if there's something that can be done to prevent it, why not). They link to instructions for Windows, and I was wondering if anyone knew how to get this done on Ubuntu.
I apologize if these questions have been answered before, but I was unable to find them. Thank you in advance for all the help and I appreciate your time; I know topics like this are pretty boring to read/answer compared to the other stuff that's usually posted.
submitted by ArmoryQuestions to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

armory offline instructions Installing Bitcoin Armory Bitcoin Armory Setup - YouTube Setting up cold storage in Armory on Ubuntu 14.04 How to install Bitcoin Armory in Ubuntu 14.04

How To Run a Bitcoin Full Node over Tor on an Ubuntu (Linux) Virtual. This would armory it to detect the presence of Bitcoin Core. Bitcoin Cold Storage Using a Bitcoin Core Wallet. This last command may take some time, during which both Bitcoin Core and all of its dependencies will be installed.Download Install and How to UseFull-featured Bitcoin wallet management application.Copay Armory ... Armory offers an offline bundle designed to simplify the process of offline installation on Ubuntu 12.04. However, some users, including myself, ran into problems using it. Moreover, some situations call for installing Armory on other Linux systems. What’s needed is a simple procedure for creating an Armory offline bundle on arbitrary Linux ... Home / post / How To Install Bitcoin Core In Ubuntu By : Laravelcode January 18, 2018 Category 3328 views Today, we are share with you how to install bitcoin core in your ubuntu system and how to get your bitcoin address. Bitcoin Core is free and open source Bitcoin wallet software devloped by Bitcoin Foundation. You Bitcoin-Qt). The most common point of confusion is that Armory is not looking for “bitcoin-qt”, it is looking for “bitcoind” - it’s a different executable. This is the version of Bitcoin software that runs in the background with no user interface. If you are in Ubuntu using the Bitcoin PPA you have to install it separately: Configurability and security make Linux a favorite operating system for running Bitcoin Core. This guide shows how to install and run Bitcoin Core on a clean Ubuntu 18.04 system. Prerequisites. Although Ubuntu carries Bitcoin Core in the Software Center, the release tends to be out-of-date. For this reason, this tutorial won’t use the ...

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armory offline instructions

Install Bitcoin Wallet In Linux Mint ( Ubuntu ) Bitcoin official page : https://bitcoin.org/en/ Some thing that you need to know about Bitcoin: https://bitco... How to install and use armory offline on linux 1TipMeWsx7KNoX6Lap3Vh3PM8B8EYuRJj. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind Linux terminal new stuff: clear, ll, cd, touch, echo, cat, shutdown www.bitcoinhackers.org Watch me setup Armory from start to finish along with downloading the blockchain from Bitcoin Core. Armory: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/ Bitcoin Core: http... BitCoin mining on Ubuntu using specialized ASIC procesors and Ubuntu software such as: CGMiner, BFGMiner, EasyMiner https://linuxhint.com/best-usb-bitcoin-mi...

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